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Democratic Party Platform 1912

DECLARATION OF PRINCIPLES OR PLATFORM ADOPTED AT

DEMOCRATIC STATE CONVENTION AT AUGUSTA ON MARCH 19, 1912.

The Democratic party of Maine in State Convention assembled, submits to the voters the following platform:-

We congratulate ourselves upon the splendid record which democracy is making in the State and in the Nation and extend our promise of renewed support to our Honored Governor, Frederick W. Plaisted, and to Senators Charles F. Johnson, Obadiah Gardiner, and Representatives Daniel J. McGillicuddy and Samuel W. Gould, who are so ably and faithfully representing Maine at Washington.

We insist that the work of the present State Administration is entitled to endorsement not only by all democrats, but by every citizen who places the welfare of the State above mere partisanship.

The public debt has been reduced nearly a million dollars in less than fifteen months. The credit of the State which had been entirely exhausted by republican extravagance and mismanagement, has been restored. The State Tax has been lowered from five mills in 1910 to four mills in 1912, a saving to the people of more than four hundred and fifty thousand dollars for the year 1912 alone.

The expense of carrying on the State Government in 1911, aside from the payment of debts and increase of appropriation for the common schools is approximately $1,000,000 less than in 1909. All of this has been accomplished without 1oss of efficiency in the public service. Democracy has demonstrated its ability to govern Maine wisely, economically and honestly.

If again entrusted with power we pledge ourse1ves to continue the work of good government which has been so auspiciously begun. We will enact such laws as will aid in the industrial development of the State and assist in bringing to our people the greatest possible measure of prosperity.

We will combine economy with progress, check waste and extravagance, equi1ize as far as possible, the burden of taxation, encourage thrift and enterprise and endeavor to keep always in mind the great principle that the Democratic party exists for the benefit of many and is an unwavering opponent to special privilege in every form. We will continue the wise policy of giving absolute publicity to the condition of state finances, by publishing monthly balance sheets in accordance with our present system, setting forth clearly at all times the status of the people’s finances.

We advocate the submitting to the people of an amendment to the Constitution relative to the issuing of state bonds to the extent of $2,000,000 for the purpose of inaugurating a system of State Road building, in order to bring the farm and the market into closer and more economical connections, for the benefit of the producer and the consumer. Such a bond issue can be easily oared for, principal and interest by the proceeds of licenses on automobiles thus conferring a great and lasting benefit on our average property holder without any increase in his taxes.

We advocate the development of our water powers for use in Maine exc1usively, under State control and under such regulations as will be fair and reasonable toward private capital while fully protecting all pubic interests,

We advocate the creation of a Public Utility Commission and a State Bureau of’ Commerce and Trade.

We advocate such changes in our Banking Laws as will cause a larger portion of the savings of our people to be invested at home.

We advocate the passage of an Employers Liability Law which will fully protect laborers who are injured while in the emp1oy of others.

We advocate the equalization of taxation and assert that it is a subject that demands prompt attention. The farmers and small property owners of the State are paying more than their share of the tax burdens. We favor an amendment to the Constitution of the State that will permit of the classification of property for taxation purposes.

The prohibitory law has never been and can never he satisfactorily enforced in communities in which public sentiment is opposed to it. Denying to such communities the right to regulate the liquor traffic, within their own borders, in some reasonable and practical way, has brought shout a system nullification of law which, is repugnant to all right thinking men. Any law which rests upon the broad principle of local self government is sure to work out good results among a people like ours, and we propose to use all possible endeavor to amend the Constitution by adding to the Prohibitory Amendment the following paragraph:

“This Section shall not apply to cities, in which the manufacture, sale and keeping for sale of intoxicating liquors, may he permitted under such regulations as the legislature may provide. And whenever fifty-one per cent of the legal voters in any town petition the legislature to grant the inhabitants of said town the privilege herein granted to cities, such privilege shall be granted. But in no case shall the legislature permit the manufacture, sale or keeping for sale of intoxicating liquors in any city or town, without making such permission conditional upon its approval by the voters of said city or town.”

Source: Maine State Archives.

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This entry was last modified: April 26, 2013 01:47 PM

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