Maine: An Encyclopedia
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Amphibians

Amphibians, part of Maine’s wildlife population, are cold-blooded vertebrate (having a backbone) animals usually living on land but breeding in water, where their offspring change into adults.

Salamanders

An example of a Maine amphibian is the Spotted Salamander. It breeds in vernal pools (pools that have water in the spring but dry up later in the year). Their habitat may be threatened by clearing or filling of the land to eliminate the vernal pools. This could be the result of road building, clear cut logging, housing or other building development, among other factors.

This Spotted Salamander was found along the Appalachian Trail in the Town of Monson in the fall of 2007.

Spotted Salamander in Monson (2007)

Spotted Salamander in Monson (2007)

Frogs

A frog is a frog, of course, of course!  Well, not exactly.  Among those in Maine are Treefrogs, Pickerel frogs and Wood frogs.

Bullfrogs, such as those shown at Daicey Pond in Baxter State Park, are the largest frogs in New England at almost five inches.  While they are yellowish green above the head and back, their size and deep voice distinguishes them from the green frogs.

The smaller green frog measures three inches.  They are green about the head, top and under the jaw, with dark spots on the lower back and sides.

Here is a sample from the Cathance River in Topsham to Daicey and Kidney ponds in Baxter Park, and from the Appalachian Trail south of the Park.

 

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Additional resources

Maine Audubon Society, http://maineaudubon.org/conserve/citsci/v_insert.pdf

National Audubon Society. Field Guide to New England. New York, NY. Knopf. 1998. pp. 267-268.




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This entry was last modified: September 20, 2017 10:49 PM

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