Maine: An Encyclopedia
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Wayne

Location Map for Wayne

Location Map for Wayne

Year Population
1970 577
1980 680
1990 1,029
2000 1,112
2010 1,189
Wayne Population Chart 1800-2010

Population Trend 1800-2010

Geographic Data
N. Latitude 44:30:48
W. Latitude 69:26:08
Maine House District 76
Maine Senate District 22
Congress District 2
Area sq. mi. (total) 39.5
Area sq. mi. (land) 38.9
Population/sq.mi. (land) 52.5
County: Kennebec

Total=land+water; Land=land only
Pocasset Lake (2001)

Pocasset Lake (2001)

[WAYN] is a town in Kennebec County, incorporated on February 12, 1798 from New Sandwich Plantation. It annexed land from Leeds (1810, 1859), and from Livermore (1821), but conceded land to Winthrop (1816, 1838, 1852) and Readfield (1821). The first settler arrived from Sandwich, Massachusetts in 1773. It had also been known as Pocasset.

The town was named for General “Mad Anthony” Wayne, a Revolutionary War hero who commanded Fort Ticonderoga and Captured Stony Point, on the Hudson River, from the British.

Pocasset Lake (2013)

Pocasset Lake (2013) @

Pocasset Lake Dam i(2013)

Pocasset Lake Dam i(2013) @

Old Town Office in North Wayne (2013)

Old Town Office in North Wayne (2013) @

1840 Wayne Town House on Route 133 (2013)

1840 Wayne Town House on Route 133 (2013) @

Wayne is the birthplace of 19th century opera star Annie Louise Cary (1842-1921).

Coolidge Road Farmhouse (2013)

Coolidge Road Farmhouse (2013) @

Old North Wayne Schoolhouse (2013)

Old North Wayne Schoolhouse 1855-1961 (2013) @

1850 North Wayne Church (2013)

1850 North Wayne Church (2013) @

The late 19th century landscape was reported as follows in the Gazetteer of Maine:

At North Wayne, on the stream connecting Lovejoy’s with Wing’s Pond, are the mills of the North Wayne Paper Company; which, with the dwelling-houses and other buildings belonging to the company, constitute a pleasant little village. At Wayne village, on the stream connecting Wayne and Androscoggin ponds, are a woolen factory, a grist-mill, a shovel  handle factory, and a sash and blind factory. Other manufactures at this place are carriages and tinware, machinery and harrows, and marble and granite works.

Large, abandoned building near the village dam (2013)

Large, abandoned building near the village dam (2013) @

Dam at Lovejoy Pond in North Wayne (2013)

Dam at Lovejoy Pond in North Wayne (2013) @

Lovejoy Pond in North Wayne (2013)

Lovejoy Pond in North Wayne (2013) @

In its 2001 Comprehensive Plan, the town was characterized as “composed primarily of residences, small farms, seasonal and vacation homes, and limited retail and commercial development.”

Wayne General Store on Route 133 (2013)

Wayne General Store on Route 133 (2013) @

Post Office and Takeout Food on Route 133 (2013)

Post Office and Takeout Food on Route 133 (2013) @

Wayne Corner Store at Rt 133 and Coolidge Road (2013)

Wayne Corner Store at Rt 133 and Coolidge Road (2013) @

Boat Ramp on Androscoggin Lake off Route 133 (2013)

Boat Ramp on Androscoggin Lake off Route 133 (2013) @

Wayne Elementary School and Town Office on Pond Road (2013)

Wayne Elementary School and Town Office on Pond Road (2013) @

The main village lies between Pocasset Lake and Androscoggin Lake on Maine Route 133. Other substantial ponds add to the town’s recreational attractions.

Form of Government: Town Meeting-Select Board-Manager.

Additional resources

History of the Town of Wayne, Kennebec County, Maine: From its Settlement to 1898. Winthrop, Me.  Wilson Pond Press. 1970.

History of Wayne, Maine. 1998. (“In celebration of Wayne’s Bicentennial 1798-1998.”)

Kallop, Edward L. Golden Summertime: A Portrait of Vacation Life in Wayne, Maine, 1890-1960. Wayne, Me. Wayne Historical Society. 2005. [University of Maine, Raymond H. Fogler Library, Special Collections; Maine State Library]

Kallop, Edward L. A History of the North Wayne Tool Co.: Manufacturers of Axes, Corn Hooks, Scythes and Hay Knives. Wayne, Me. Wayne Historical Society. 2003. [University of Maine, Raymond H. Fogler Library, Special Collections; Maine State Library]

Kallop, Edward L. Johnson’s Kingdom: The Story of a Nineteenth-Century Industrial Kingdom in the Town of Wayne, Maine. Wayne, Me. Wayne Historical Society. 2000.

Mitchell, H. E. (Harry Edward). The Town Register: Wayne, Wales, Monmouth, Leeds, Greene, 1905. Brunswick, Me. H. E. Mitchell. 1905.

Perkins, Jack. Illustrated History of Wayne, Maine; being a contemporary and past history of a small New England Town. Wayne, Me. 1968.

Town of Wayne Comprehensive Plan 2001. (available through the Town’s web site: http://www.waynemaine.org (accessed April 27, 2012)

*United States. Department of the Interior. National Park service. “Wayne Town House.” https://npgallery.nps.gov/pdfhost/docs/nrhp/text/76000098.PDF (accessed March 11, 2017)

Varney, George J. A Gazetteer of the State of Maine. 1886.  pp. 573-574.

National Register of Historic Places – Listings

Wayne Town House

[Maine Route 133] The 1840 town house in Wayne is among the earliest in Maine. The interior is comprised of an open meeting room. A large floor space in the center is flanked on the east and west walls by original plank benches placed in a graduated elevation from the floor like modern bleachers.

It is the only one remaining in the state where not only are the benches for men and women (who originally could not vote) on opposite sides facing each other on a sloping floor, but where the segregation of sexes at town meeting time was, in 1975, still observed for tradition’s sake.

For 42 years prior to the erection of this building, annual and other business meetings of the town were held in private buildings, school houses or the Methodist Church. In 1839 the inhabitants of the town voted to build a town house and in 1840 specified that the foundations should be made three feet thick.* [See photo above.]

Wing Family Cemetery, Pond Road, east side, north of junction with Maine Route 133

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