Maine: An Encyclopedia
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Troy

Classic Barn in Troy (2006)

Classic Barn and Farm Buildings in Troy (2006)

Location Map for Troy

Location Map for Troy

Year Population
1970 543
1980 701
1990 802
2000 963
2010 1,030
Troy Population Chart 1830-2010

Population Trend 1830-2010

Geographic Data
N. Latitude 44:40:30
W. Latitude 69:15:18
Maine House District 99
Maine Senate District 11
Congress District 2
Area sq. mi. (total) 35.5
Area sq. mi. (land) 34.8
Population/sq.mi. (land) 29.6
County: Waldo

Total=land+water; Land=land only
Veterans Memorial (2006)

Veterans Memorial (2006)

[TROY] is a town in Waldo County, settled in about 1801, it was incorporated on February 22, 1812 from Bridge’s Plantation, formerly the township T4 R1 NWP.

Troy Central School (2001)

Troy Central School (2001)

Troy Town Office (2006)

Troy Town Office (2006)

The community has had a long succession of names. First incorporated as Kingville, it changed its name to Joy three years later in 1815, only to switch to Montgomery in 1826, and finally to Troy in 1827.

Grange Hall (2001)

Grange Hall (2001)

Those honored by these names were General Bridge of Massachusetts, an early proprietor, Governor William King, Benjamin Joy, an early proprietor, and English General Montgomery who died in the battle for Quebec.

The 1840 Troy Union Meeting House is a classic example of a type of meeting house or church in Maine in the four decades prior to the Civil War. Built as a Union Church, without a specific denomination, the building served the members of the Troy Meeting House Society, and by extension as the only church in the town, the community. The building features both Greek Revival and Gothic Revival stylistic details. Mount Holly Cemetery adjoins the church.

Troy Union Church (2010)

Troy Union Church (2010)

Mt. Holly Cemetery on Route 202 and 9 in Troy (2010)

Mt. Holly Cemetery (2010)

Other nearby examples include the 1835 Dixmont Corner Church, the 1841 Unity Union Church, and the 1842 South Solon Meeting House. as a locally significant example of rural church architecture.

Carlton Pond and Bog in the northeast of the town are the sources of Carlton Stream, which empties into nearby Unity Pond. In the 19th century the stream supported several lumber mills.

In the 1880’s the town was home to a thriving horse carriage industry, with five manufacturers.

A population of 1,059 in 1880 (similar to that in 2010) supported eleven schoolhouses.

Maine Route 220 joins U.S. Route 202/Maine Route 9 at Green’s Corner near the shore of Unity Pond. Carleton Pond, Bog, and Stream are accessible from Route 220 in the north end of town.

Form of Government: Town Meeting-Select Board.

Additional resources

Maine Historic Preservation Commission. Augusta, Me. “Troy Union Meeting House, Troy, 1840.” http://www.maine.gov/tools/whatsnew /index.php?topic=mhpc_recent_listings&id=321771&v=article (accessed April 13, 2012) [text edited and condensed]

Varney, George J. A Gazetteer of the State of Maine. 1886. p. 544.

National Register of Historic Places

Troy Union Meeting House

[514 Bangor Road] The 1840 Troy Union Meeting House is a classic example of a meeting house or church built in by some rural communities in Maine.  Built as a Union Church, without a specific denomination, the building served the members of the Troy Meeting House Society, and as the only church in town, the community. The building features both Greek Revival and Gothic Revival stylistic details on the exterior and a relatively stark interior with modified box pews, wainscoting, and a now-blocked balcony.

This is the type of rural church commonly built prior to the Civil War. They featured a rectangular footprint with a box belfry positioned atop the front roof ridge and topped with four spirelets. A twin entrance, balcony, and relatively plain sanctuary was a typical interior. [See photo above.]

Other nearby examples include the 1835 Dixmont Corner Church, the 1841 Unity Union Church, and the 1842 South Solon Meeting House, approximately 30 miles northeast of Troy.

Source: “Troy Union Meeting House, Troy, 1840.” http://www.maine.gov/tools/whatsnew/index.php?topic=mhpc_recent_listings&id=321771&v=article (accessed March 10, 2017)

Seven Star Grange, #73

[696 Bangor Road] The Seven Star Grange # 73 is a building that has served the community of Troy since 1876. The hall was built by members of the Grange to serve as their meeting hall, only three years after the first Grange was established in Maine. Throughout the 19th and first half of the 20th centuries the Grange, or Patron’s of Husbandry, was an important social and fraternal organization with an emphasis on agricultural education.  588 individual Granges were established in Maine between 1873 and 1985.

Each Grange focused on assisting the local community. In many towns, including Troy, it became a center for social activity. The design of the Troy Grange illustrates two important aspects of the organization: the early adoption of cooperative purchasing with a Grange Store, and later broadening community use of the building by adding a stage. [See photo above.]

Source: http://www.maine.gov/tools/whatsnew/index.php?topic=mhpc_recent_listings&id=321770&v=article (accessed March 10, 2017)





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