Maine: An Encyclopedia
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Status of Women 1892 Statistics

STATISTICS FROM A SURVEY FOR THE COMMISSIONER OF INDUSTRIAL AND LABOR STATISTICS REPORT, 1892

[pp. 150-151]

Women Wage Workers by Occupation 1892

Women Wage Workers by Occupation 1892

Out of a total of 2,583 there are 115 who cannot read and 124 Who cannot write the English language, or between four and five per cent. They are found in seventeen different industries which are given, together with the total number at work in each industry, in the following table:

a. b. c. d.
Cotton mills 52 19 19 36
Wig making 3 1 1 33
Junk shops 32 9 10 28
Hotel work 173 39 40 22
Boarding house work 43 9 10 21
Family work 82 9 11 11
Laundry work 95 8 10 8
Fish and fruit canning 29 2 2 7
Match factory 47 3 2 6
Cigar making 19 1 1 5
Saloon work 84 3 4 4
Dress making 179 5 5 3
Box making 36 1 1 3
Shirt making 67 1 1 1.5
Shoe making 401 4 4 1
Tailoring 155 1 1
Saleswomen 267 1

___________________________________

a. Number at work; b. Cannot read English
c. Cannot write English
d. Per cent who cannot read English

The religious preferences as given by the 2,793 who made returns are as follows:

Catholics 856
Methodists 424
Congregationalists 352
Baptists 290
No preference 288
Universalists 187
Free Baptists 146
Episcopalians 106
Any Protestant 35
Presbyterians 31
Unitarians 28
Adventists 15
Spiritualists 14
Swendenborgians 6
Friends 5
Lutherans 4
Danish 3
Jew 1
Christian 1
Salvation Army 1
Total 2793

Additional resources

Annual reports of State agencies, in the published Laws of Maine for various years, found at the State Law and Legislative Library, the Maine State Archives, and frequently at major Maine college and university libraries.

See also a discussion of the status of Maine women in the 1874 OPINIONS OF THE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT, and in the LIST OF EMPLOYMENTS elsewhere in the 1892 report.

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