Maine: An Encyclopedia
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Scarborough

Location Map for Scarborough

Location Map for Scarborough

Year Population
1970 7,845
1980 11,347
1990 12,518
2000 16,970
2010 18,919
Geographic Data
N. Latitude 43:34:54
W. Latitude 70:21:40
Maine House Dist 27,28,29
Maine Senate District 29,30
Congress District 1
Area sq. mi. (total) 55.3
Area sq. mi. (land) 47.7
Population/sq.mi (land) 396.6
County: Cumberland

Total=land+water; Land=land only
Scarborough Population Chart 1800-2010

Population Trend 1800-2010

Scarborough Marsh (2002)

Scarborough Marsh (2002)

Scarborough Town Seal

[SKAR-buh-roo] is a town in Cumberland County, settled in 1630 and incorporated on July 14, 1658 from the towns of Black Point and Blue Point, and nearby islands.

According to the town’s web site:

The settlement of Scarborough was one of the earliest made on the New England coast. John Jocelyn, writer, botanist and English nobleman, came to Scarborough in 1663 to visit his brother Henry Jocelyn, who had settled on Prout’s Neck. His visit lasted eight years. His writings offer the best history of that time. He wrote that the province of Maine had plenty of magistrates, husbandmen and planters, but very few skilled craftsmen.

Though it was abandoned in the Indian raids of 1690, it held a town meeting on May 8, 1718 signaling a return of settlers to the area. It ceded land in 1841 to Saco and 1864 to Gorham before completing its modern boundaries.

Sign: Welcome to Scarborough (2002)

Sign: Welcome to Scarborough (2002)

Benen Foster was a Revolutionary War veteran who was born in Scarborough in 1763. His deposition applied for State bounty lands to be given to these veterans summarizes his service in the war.

It is the birthplace of Maine’s first governor and advocate for statehood: William King. The town was almost the retirement home for another governor, Enoch Lincoln, who died before he could retire to the farm he had purchased here.

Church in Scarborough (2002)

Church in Scarborough (2002)

Winslow Homer lived and painted in Prout’s Neck, a somewhat isolated peninsula that now is home to a bird sanctuary donated by the artist’s brother, Charles.

Homer’s work is often featured at the Portland Museum of Art. Famed architect, John Calvin Stevens, designed cottages in the Neck for Charles and Winslow.

The town’s fine beaches and the Scarborough Downs race track and off-track betting facility are attractions for many.

Scarborough Marsh, operated by the Maine Audubon Society, offers guided canoe trips, canoe rentals, bird walks and a museum and visitor center at Maine’s largest salt marsh.

The Scarborough Marsh Wildlife Management Area is managed by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife in a federal-state partnership program.

Nearby Scarborough River provides recreational boating opportunities and open space.

Scarborough Marsh (2002)

Scarborough Marsh (2002)

Scarborough Marsh (2002)

Scarborough Marsh (2002)

Scarborough Beach (2002)

Scarborough Beach (2002)

Sign: Scarborough Wildlife Management Area (2002)

Sign: Scarborough Wildlife Management Area

A suburb of Portland, the rapidly growing community now ranks as tenth most populous in Maine according to the 2000 U.S. Census, up from 13th place in 1990, having grown almost 36 percent in ten years. One of the manifestation of the growth in diversity as well as numbers is the establishment, in a former Universalist Church, of the first Hindu temple in Maine in 2012.

Former Church, now a Hindu Temple (2012)

Hindu Temple (2012) @

Hindu Temple (2014)

Hindu Temple (2014)

Hindu Temple Auxiliary Building (2014)

Hindu Temple Auxiliary Building (2014)

Alger Hall, below right, is a community building that also houses the Masons Lodge.

Scarborough Fire Department (2007)

Scarborough Fire Department (2007)

Scarborough Historical Museum (2007)

Scarborough Historical Museum (2007)

Scarborough Municipal Building (2007)

Municipal Building (2007)

Scarborough Downs (2007)

Scarborough Downs (2007)

Scarborough Downs (2007)

Scarborough Downs (2007)

Alger Hall in Scarborough (2007)

Alger Hall in Scarborough (’07)

Form of Government: Council-Manager

Additional resources

Chapman, Leonard Bond. Monograph on the Southgate Family of Scarborough, Maine, their ancestors and descendants. Portland, Me. H. W. Bryant, 1907.

Chase, Georgiana P. Stratton’s Islands of Saco Bay: An Interwoven History 1605-1993. Fort Bragg, California. Mendocino Lithographers. 1994.

Henley, Thomas Shaw. Dunstan Cemetery Records Scarborough, Maine: stone inscriptions and old records combined and indexed. Maine. T. S. Henley and S. J. Bentley. 1985.

Hight, LeRoy L. “A Scarborough Tory.” 1899. Excerpt from New England Magazine, June 1899.

Libbey, Dorothy Shaw. Scarborough Becomes a Town. Portland, Me. B. Wheelwright Co. 1955.

Mitchell, H. E. The Scarboro Register, 1905. Brunswick, Me. H. E. Mitchell Co. 1905.

Moulton, Augustus Freedom. The Settlement of Scarborough: Charles Pine, Hunter and Indian Fighter. 1998. Scarborough. Dover, N.H. Arcadia Publishing. 1996. (pictorial)

Scarborough, Maine 1658 – 1958: Three Hundredth Anniversary. [Special Collections, Fogler Library, University of Maine. Orono.]

Scarborough, Me. “About Our Town.” http://www.scarborough.me.us/home/documents/about/index.html (accessed July 8, 2012)

Scarborough, Me.  Council-Manager Charter of the Town of Scarborough. Scarborough, Me. Town of Scarborough. 1984.

Scarborough River (2002)

Scarborough River (2002)

Southgate, William S. The History of Scarborough from 1633-1783. Maine. S. J. Bentley and T. S. Henley. 1998.

Sylvester, Herbert Milton. The Sokoki Trail. Boston. Stanhope Press. 1907

National Register of Historic Places – Listings

Dunstan Methodist Episcopal Church, US 1

Homer, Winslow, Studio, Winslow Homer Road, Prout’s Neck

Hunniwell, Richard, House, West of Scarborough at Winnock’s Neck and Old County Roads

Portland Railroad Company Substation, US 1 West Scarborough

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