Maine: An Encyclopedia
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Samoset

(1590?-1655) was the Indian sagamore, from the Pemaquid area, who in 1621 was visiting chief Massasoit when he surprised the Pilgrims of Plymouth with the words, “Much welcome, Englishmen.”

According to Isaacson, “He explained that he was a sachem and had learned the language from Englishmen engaged in fishing off Monhegan, and named many boat captains. He was apparently accustomed to English fare, eating without comment the food offered. On his next visit he brought Squando. The advice of the Indians enabled the Pilgrims to replenish their dwindling stores, a friendly act that was later repaid with treachery. Samoset was entertained, with other Indian leaders, in 1624 in Portland Harbor by Captain Christopher Leavitt.”

On July 15, 1625, Samoset granted a deed, believed to be the first from an Indian to the colonists, to John Brown for 12,000 acres of land in the Damariscotta area.

Additional resources

Isaacson, Dorris A. Maine: A Guide Downeast, p. 329.

Matthews, Albert. The Indian Sagamore Samoset. Cambridge Ma. John Wilson and Son, 1901. Cambridge. University Press. [University of Maine, Raymond H. Fogler Library, Special Collections; Maine State Library]

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This entry was last modified: October 08, 2013 10:41 PM

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