Maine: An Encyclopedia
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Marshfield

Location Map for Marshfield

Location Map for Marshfield

Year Population
1970 227
1980 416
1990 461
2000 494
2010 518
Marshfield Population Chart 1850-2010

Population Trend 1850-2010

Geographic Data
N. Latitude 44:46:31
W. Latitude 67:30:27
Maine House District 138
Maine Senate District 6
Congress District 2
Area sq. mi. (total) 17.6
Area sq. mi. (land) 17.1
Population/sq.mi. (land) 30.3
County: Washington

Total=land+water; Land=land only

[MARSH-field] is a town in Washington County, incorporated on June 30, 1846 from a portion of Machias.

The main village lies just north of Machias on Maine Route 192 and on the Middle River, which empties into the Machias River. The captured British schooner Margaretta was hidden by being hauled out of sight up the Middle River.

Marshfield is dotted with small lakes and the marshes that reflect its name.

Second Mark’s lake is located in a remote section of the town and is one of the headwater lakes on the middle river, which flows into the Machias river estuary.

Formerly, the lake’s remote location limited fishing pressure to levels that did not require stocking. A logging road has improved access and resulted in more fishing pressure and a need for stocking.1

Keeley Lake is located east of Route 192 in Marshfield. Vehicular access from the east is over a lengthy gravel road. In the winter, some anglers walk or snowshoe in along another woods road off Route 192.

In those winters when the larger lakes have unsafe ice in the early part of the season, Keeley can usually be safely fished. A canoe or small boat can be launched at the first access location.2

Even in a relatively remote area, degradation of lake water may follow development. The small Six-Mile lake in Marshfield and Whitneyville near route 192 is used by swimmers during the summer. Marshfield maintains a public boat launch for small boats and canoes. The lake once provided good fishing but the quality of the fishery declined substantially in the late 1980s. The pond had suffered a declined in water quality, probably because of the year-round homes and camps built close the lake. Failing septic systems were the likely source of the problem.3

These assessments may not have been updated by the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, but may be of interest to those using the lakes.

Form of Government: Town Meeting-Select Board.

Additional resources

1 Maine. Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. “Second Marks Lake.” Augusta, Me. 1988. http://www.maine.gov/ifw/fishing/lakesurvey_maps/washington/marks_lake_second.pdf (accessed March 21, 2014)

2 Maine. Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. “Keeley Lake.” Augusta, Me. 2001. http://www.maine.gov/ifw/fishing/lakesurvey_maps/washington/keeley_lake.pdf (accessed March 21, 2014)

3 Maine. Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. “Six-Mile Lake.” Augusta, Me. 1995. http://www.maine.gov/ifw/fishing/lakesurvey_maps/washington/six_mile_lake.pdf (accessed March 21, 2014)

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This entry was last modified: December 04, 2014 11:43 PM

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