Maine: An Encyclopedia
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Lakes

Moosehead Lake (2002)

Moosehead Lake (2002)

Sebago Lake (2001)

Sebago Lake (2001)

Chesuncook Lake from the Peak of Mount Katahdin (2007)

Chesuncook from Katahdin

Chamberlain Lake (Maine Department of Conservation Photo)

Chamberlain Lake (Maine Department of Conservation)

1940's Township C Topographic Map

Lower Richardson Lake

The following are the locations and sizes of Maine’s twenty largest lakes. Historical ice out dates for Maine Lakes are one measure of the impact climate change in the state.

See more details for Maine’s sixty largest lakes.

Name Town County Acres Sq.mi.
Moosehead Greenville Piscataquis 74,890 117.02
Sebago Sebago Cumberland 28,771 44.95
Chesuncook T5 R12 WELS Piscataquis 23,070 36.05
Flagstaff Flagstaff Twp Somerset 20,300 31.72
Pemadumcook T1 R10 WELS Penobscot 18,300 28.59
Spednic Vanceboro Washington 17,219 26.90
Mooselookmeguntik Richardson Twp Franklin 14,101 25.47
Grand Lake (east) Forest City TWP Aroostook 16,070 25.11
Grand Lake (west) T5 ND BPP Washington 14,340 22.41
Chamberlain T7 R12 WELS Piscataquis 11,084 17.32
Big Lake* Grand Lake Stream Washington 10,305 16.10
Brassua Rockwood Strip E. Somerset 8,979 14.03
Millinocket T1 R8 WELS Penobscot 8,960 14.00
Eagle Lake (big) Eagle Lake Piscataquis 8,288 12.95
Great Pond Belgrade Kennebec 8,239 12.87
Square Lake T16 R5 WELS Aroostook 8,150 12.73
Graham Mariaville Hancock 7,865 12.29
Umbagog Magalloway Plt. Oxford 7,850 12.27
Schoodic Lake View Plt. Piscataquis 7,168 11.20
Richardson Lakes Richardsontown Oxford 7,100 11.09

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*see Indian Township, which shares the lake with Grand Lake Stream

Dead River Under Flagstaff Lake

Dead River Under Flagstaff Lake

Lakes or Ponds?

According to the Maine Department of Environmental Protection,

About half of the 6,000 lakes and ponds that have been assigned a state identification number have been named, many having two or three names. At least thirty have one name with the word lake in it and the other with the word pond. For example, Bryant Pond is also known as Lake Christopher and Dexter Pond sports the name Wassookeag Lake! It is often these dual names that make folks wonder exactly where do we draw the line in Maine?

One classic distinction is that sunlight penetrates to the bottom of all areas of a pond in contrast to lakes, which have deep waters that receive no sunlight at all. Another is that ponds generally have small surface areas and lakes have large surfaces. So a combination of surface area and depth are considered from a technical perspective.

No clear line exists between lakes and ponds. However, Maine law defines lakes and ponds greater than ten acres in size as Great Ponds.

Additional resources

Maine Department of Environmental Protection. “Lake or Pond???” http://www.maine.gov/dep/water/lakes/lkepond.html (accessed June 29, 2915)

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