Maine: An Encyclopedia
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Howland

Location Map for Howland

Location Map for Howland

Year Population
1970 1,468
1980 1,602
1990 1,435
2000 1,362
2010 1,241
Howland Population Chart 1830-2010

Population Trend 1830-2010

Geographic Data
N. Latitude 45:15:42
W. Latitude 68:42:17
Maine House District 142
Maine Senate District 5
Congress District 2
Area sq. mi. (total) 35.3
Area sq. mi. (land) 34.7
Population/sq.mi. (land) 35.8
County: Penobscot

Total=land+water; Land=land only

From 1980 through 2010 Howland has seen a decline in population as employment options dwindled.

Penobscot River South of Howland Village on Route 116 (2005)[HOW-lnd] is a town in Penobscot County, incorporated on February 10, 1826 from township T1 R7 NWP. It later set off land to form the town (now township) of Mattamiscontis in 1839. Alewives, once a plentiful fish in the area, no longer available after a dam at Eddington Bend barred their migratory progress upstream after 1834.

The name is taken from John Howland (1592-1673) one of the signers of the Mayflower Compact and the first land agent at Cushnoc (Augusta). Early white settlers move in about 1818 with more arriving after statehood in 1820.

In 1886, an observer noted that Little Seboeis Lake was located in the northern portion of the town. A review of a current map shows no lake but a few very small ponds within a marsh. Such changes in the landscape are not unusual. The area is now managed by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife as the “Old Pond Farm Wildlife Management Area.”  Eagles, osprey, deer, moose, and water birds may be seen there.

Dam at the Junction of the Piscataquis and Penobscot Rivers (2005)

Dam, Junction of Piscataquis and Penobscot Rivers (2005)

1929 Bridge Across the Piscataquis River (2005)

1929 Bridge Across the Piscataquis River (2005)

Situated at the Junction of the Piscataquis River with the Penobscot, and Seboeis Stream with the Piscataquis, the town once had a thriving paper mill, The Advance Bag and Paper Company (see Carl E. Ring reference below.) The old mill remains empty.

Log trucks refueling at I-95 Exit (2005)

Log trucks refueling at I-95 Exit (2005)

Former Pine Tree Tannery Building (2005)

Former Pine Tree Tannery Building (2005)

Today, the major thoroughfares are Interstate 95 and Maine Routes 6, 155, and 116 which hugs the west side of the Penobscot River.

Form of Government: Town Meeting-Select Board-Manager.

Additional sources

Chadbourne, Ava Harriet. Maine Place Names and The Peopling of its Towns.

“Pond Farm WMA.” Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. State of Maine. http://www.maine.gov/ifw/wildlife/management/wma/region_f/pondfarm.htm

Ring, Carl Edwin. A Study of Steam, its Generation, Distribution, and Use in a Pulp and Paper Mill. (Thesis (B.S.) in Mechanical Engineering–University of Maine, 1925) [University of Maine, Raymond H. Fogler Library, Special Collections]

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This entry was last modified: November 30, 2014 08:26 PM

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