Maine: An Encyclopedia
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Black Bridge

????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????The 1909, 318-foot long truss bridge was built by Pennsylvania Steel Company of Steelton, Pennsylvania, replacing an earlier double-decker bridge.  It spans the Androscoggin River between Brunswick and Topsham.

According to the website HistoricBridges.org:

This double deck bridge is one of the most unusual and unique bridges in Maine due to its suspended highway deck which runs under the truss of this bridge. The truss also has a deck in the “normal” place for railroad traffic. Structurally, the bridge is essentially a rivet-connected railroad through truss bridge with no unusual details aside from its use of a Warren truss that is subdivided in a manner similar to a Baltimore truss. However, there is one detail on the truss superstructure that is unique which is the bottom chord connections also have pins in them. These pins hold eyebars which in turn connect to pins at the floorbeams under the bridge which hold the unique suspended highway deck.

The Maine Department of Transportation has notified the two towns that it plans to demolish the car deck in 2014. The upper steel deck will be retained.

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Additional resources

“BlackBridge.” http://www.historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=maine/androscogginriverrr/ (accessed July 12, 2014)

Leonard,J.T. “MDOT plans to remove crumbling car deck from Brunswick bridge.” Times Record. July 5, 2013. http://bangordailynews.com/2013/07/05/news/midcoast/mdot-plans-to-remove-crumbling-car-deck-from-brunswick-bridge/ (accessed July 12, 2014)

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This entry was last modified: July 12, 2014 03:12 PM

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